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Last updated 9/29/2013

 

German Blood Runs Thick

By Bob Williamson

These are extracts taken from letters written by my grandfather Martin D Ulmer from his home in Pennsylvania. His brother Emanuel had come to Nebraska with the Johnnie Heim family in 1881 to marry Jacob G Heim’s daughter, Sarah.  Martin and his mother Catherine Ulmer and brother Israel and sister Sarah came west in 1884.

   Martin writes, “We are working at the apples most of the time this while back. We picked about 50 bushel of winter apples.  This forenoon we made the last cider.  We made 23 barrels of water cider.  It is worth 15 to 18 cents a gallon. Apples are selling for 80 cents to a dollar, potatoes 50 cents, eggs 30 cents, butter 25 to 28 cents.  Half a beef sold for eight and a half cents a pound and a hog for 10 cents a pound.”

   During the winter of 1883 Jacob G Heim made a visit to Pennsylvania. He visited Catherine Ulmer and her family.  He reported to their previous inquiry about a farm in Nebraska.  He told them the “Squires Place” could be purchased for $7000, but would surely go up in price soon as it was good land.  The Ulmer’s bought it on his recommendation.  This is the farm where Berton and Erma Williamson lived and the farm where Bob and Phyllis Williamson live and raised their family.

   They arrived in Dawson in November of 1885 Martin and Israel bought the farm where Elmer and Mildred Thacker lived and their daughter Marilyn and her husband Richard Ogle make their home today.  Martin married Sophia Heim and had two daughters Erma, and Mildred. Catherine, Israel and Sarah  moved to Dawson. The families kept a strong affection for Pennsylvania and the relatives left there. Through the years there have been many visits back and forth renewing acquaintances with the cousins here and back there.  This love and respect for the heritage lives on today and I suspect will be carried on for generation until the end of time.



 

  

 

 

 

 

 

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